The Art of Healing in Kashmir: how creative activities can support child wellbeing in areas of conflict 2021-22

Kashmir is the centre of both a geopolitical struggle between India and Pakistan and an indigenous independence movement, one of the most militarised areas in the world. Since 1989 more than 80,000 people have been killed and everyday life is marked by the presence of military, curfews, stone-pelting and demonstrations. Children are particularly vulnerable in militarised areas and healing trauma is central for sustainable peace.

Katkatha Puppet Trust and Vikramjeet Sinha are delivering arts-based activities and Arts Based Therapy (ABT), including drama, visual arts, and puppetry to children in Kashmir to help them manage anxiety, anger and PTSD. Evaluation of use of the arts to improve mental health is often lacking and research is being conducted with children attending the Dolphin School in Pulwama, Kashmir. This will evaluate the potential for the arts activities and arts-based therapy to support the mental health and wellbeing of children affected by conflict.

Art of Healing web site.

The project has also built a website for the school and children to exchange ideas on an ongoing basis. Kalakar Qasbah is a protected site where participants can freely post and develop their thoughts and creative work.

Research team

Michael Buser (UWE) – community resilience; arts-led research

Loraine Leeson (Middlesex) – socially engaged arts practice

Emma Brannlund (UWE) – gender, International relations, Kashmir

Nicola Holt (UWE) – mental health, conscious experience, Art Based Therapy evaluation.

Julie Mytton – (UWE) child public health, children’s participation in research, evaluation of public health interventions.

Sara Penrhyn Jones (Bath Spa) – film / film-making

WEAD SELECTED ARTIST

December 2020

Projects can gain longevity if they are rooted in community and not subject to the overarching constraints of commissions or funding bodies. Through supporting concerns identified by senior citizens in East London,  Active Energy has been able to address urgent ecological issues and discover new ways that crucial local knowledge can have an effect both locally and with a constituency far beyond its own borders.” – Dr. Loraine Leeson

cSPACE director Dr. Loraine Leeson has worked with communities through the visual arts for over forty years, creating artworks and initiatives in the public domain.

Photomontage Then and Now

Picture collages or political weapons?

Artists Peter Kennard and Loraine Leeson with writer David Evans will be discussing all things photomontage – exploring the history, techniques and effects of photomontage, from darkroom collages to digital manipulation.

A Four Corners archive event for anybody interested in the art of protest, radical culture or community activism.

6:30 PM – 8:30 Thursday 20th September 2018
Four Corners
121 Roman Road
London, E2 0QN
Map

REGISTER HERE
free

London Community Video Archive

On 9th August 2017 the London Community Video Archive went live. Its aim is to preserve, archive and share community videos made in the 1970s/80s in London Portable video recording — now a technology routinely embodied in smartphones — became available for the very first time back in the early 1970s, making it possible for individuals and communities to make their own television. The medium was taken up by people ignored or under-represented in the mainstream media – tenants on housing estates, community action groups, women, black and minority ethnic groups, youth, gay and lesbian people, and the disabled. With an overriding commitment to social empowerment and to combating exclusion, ‘Community Video’ dealt with issues which still have a contemporary resonance — housing, play-space, discrimination, youth arts.

The archive contains the video Emergency created by Loraine Leeson and Peter Dunn in 1974 in support of the campaign to keep Bethnal Green Hospital open. It also hosts an interview with Loraine that outlines how the making of this video became an important touchstone for her subsequent socially engaged art practice.

 

 

The GLC Story

On 8th May 2017 A Greater London published interviews on its GLC Story web site together with a new zine to commemorate the achievements of the Greater London Council (GLC) in the 1980s.

Loraine Leeson was interviewed in relation to the work of the GLC’s Community Arts Sub-Committee, on which she served during the Labour administration of the 1980s. During this period the most radical re-working of cultural policy that this country has seen took place in the capital, with £millions transferred from London’s ‘centres of excellence’ into cultural projects in which ordinary citizens could participate.

In 1986 the GLC was abolished by Thatcher, but A Greater London aims to recover that lost history, and uncover lessons for today. A group of volunteers collected and recorded these memories, which can be heard here. The oral history project is now complete and to share it with a wider audience a paperback zine has been published, which can be downloaded here, together with transcripts of the interviews.