The NHS: A People’s History on BBC FOUR

On 1st July 2018 BBC FOUR broadcasts the first programme in a documentary series celebrating the 70th anniversary of the NHS. It focuses on people’s memories of the health service, and include an interview with Loraine Leeson. It also features the posters on health issues she produced with Peter Dunn in the 1970s. Some of these were in support of the campaign to keep Bethnal Green Hospital open, while others were produced with members of health workers’ unions for East London Health Project to warn people about the impending cuts to services at that time – one of these posters celebrated 30th anniversary of the NHS. A retrospective exhibition of this work was held at the ICA in May 2017.

Loraine Leeson on the London Docklands

25th June 2018 saw publication of Loraine’s article Our land: creative approaches to the redevelopment of London’s Docklands in a special editon of the International Journal of Heritage Studies edited by Katazyna Kosmala: Intangible heritage and post-industrial waterfront zones: Ways of seeing.

ABSTRACT

Large-scale re-development of post-industrial sites can easily railroad 5 over the needs or wishes of its existing inhabitants, or at best involve them in peripheral consultation. However, when a community is highly organised and also collaborates with others to gather expertise and develop effective means of communication, it has the ability to re-envi- sion a future that can meet the needs of all concerned. In the 1980s The Docklands Community Poster Project engaged with a cluster of waterfront communities, which used the arts to influence the regeneration of the London Docklands. Close collaboration between local people, activists and artists led to a range of interventions implemented over a ten year period that included a series of large-scale photo-murals, travelling 15 exhibitions, initiatives and events such as the People’s Armadas to Parliament and the People’s Plan for the Royal Docks. The article makes an argument for how and why art can be an effective tool in social transformation and highlights its role in documenting and making visible the intangible cultural heritage of the communities it serves.

Book Launch

 

symposium and conversation on art and social change

6.00-8.30pm, Friday 2nd March 2018

Four Corners
121 Roman Rd, London E2 0QN
http://www.fourcornersfilm.co.uk

Join Loraine Leeson for the launch of her new book where key artists, activists and writers will lead a conversation on the role of art in social change

Ailbhe Murphy
Dr. Ailbhe Murphy is an artist and Director of Create, the national development agency for collaborative arts in Ireland. Create is a resource organisation for artists working cross art form and in collaboration with diverse communities of place and of interest. Ailbhe is also a founding member of the interdisciplinary art and research platform Vagabond Reviews. www.create-ireland.ie

Jane Trowell

Educationalist, artist and longstanding member of Platform, an artist-led, London-based collective that brings together artists, activists, researchers and campaigners who collaborate to make work on social and ecological justice. Jane Trowell’s work particularly focuses on pedagogical and social process. https://platformlondon.org

Hilary Wainwright
Widely published researcher and writer on new forms of democratic accountability and driving force/editor behind Red Pepper. She has written for many publications including The Guardian, and makes regular television and radio appearances. A member of Arts for Labour, her forthcoming book A New Politics from the Left is soon to be published.

Kerstin Mey
Professor Kerstin Mey is the newly appointed Vice President for Academic Affairs and Student Engagement at University of Limerick and previously Pro-Vice Chancellor and Dean of Westminster School of Media, Arts and Design. Kerstin’s research is concerned with the ‘situatedness’ of art, its underlying value hierarchies and public pedagogies.

With video interventions from:
Conrad Atkinson
Known for his visual art that challenges the boundaries between art and politics, Conrad Atkinson has been described as ‘one of the most important fine artists in the world who specialize in social and political concerns’. He is also Professor Emeritus of Art and Art History University of California at Davis, Distinguished Visiting Professor/Artist in Residence of the Courtauld Institute and Honorary Fellow of Cumbria University.

Javier Rodrigo
Researcher and art educator based in Barcelona who has developed projects and collaborative exhibitions on dialogical practice for cultural institutions throughout Spain and writes on the subject of community, cultural policy and education. Javier has also been the coordinator of the pedagogical-cultural project Transductores.

New article by Loraine Leeson on Cultural Democracy

 

Loraine Leeson explores the idea that art is a vital part of civilised society and should be a method of self-expression for everyone rather than the privileged few

https://mdxminds.com/2018/01/04/cultural-democracy/

Workshop by The Common, a collective of students studying Art Practice and the Community at Middlesex University. Photo ©Kerri Jefferis

Cultural democracy is not new, but rather an idea that has found a newly conducive context. This is much to do with the growing belief amongst younger generations that change is necessary and that they can and will make it happen