The NHS: A People’s History on BBC FOUR

On 1st July 2018 BBC FOUR broadcasts the first programme in a documentary series celebrating the 70th anniversary of the NHS. It focuses on people’s memories of the health service, and include an interview with Loraine Leeson. It also features the posters on health issues she produced with Peter Dunn in the 1970s. Some of these were in support of the campaign to keep Bethnal Green Hospital open, while others were produced with members of health workers’ unions for East London Health Project to warn people about the impending cuts to services at that time – one of these posters celebrated 30th anniversary of the NHS. A retrospective exhibition of this work was held at the ICA in May 2017.

London Community Video Archive

On 9th August 2017 the London Community Video Archive went live. Its aim is to preserve, archive and share community videos made in the 1970s/80s in London Portable video recording — now a technology routinely embodied in smartphones — became available for the very first time back in the early 1970s, making it possible for individuals and communities to make their own television. The medium was taken up by people ignored or under-represented in the mainstream media – tenants on housing estates, community action groups, women, black and minority ethnic groups, youth, gay and lesbian people, and the disabled. With an overriding commitment to social empowerment and to combating exclusion, ‘Community Video’ dealt with issues which still have a contemporary resonance — housing, play-space, discrimination, youth arts.

The archive contains the video Emergency created by Loraine Leeson and Peter Dunn in 1974 in support of the campaign to keep Bethnal Green Hospital open. It also hosts an interview with Loraine that outlines how the making of this video became an important touchstone for her subsequent socially engaged art practice.

 

 

Bethnal Green Hospital Campaign 1977-78

Exhibition, posters and the video Emergency were produced by Loraine Leeson and Peter Dunn to support of the campaign to save Bethnal Green Hospital from closure.

1. Health Cuts Can Kill

Poster produced for the campaign to save Bethnal GreenHospital from closure

The seventies in Britain saw the first wave of cutbacks in the National Health Service, carried out initially by the Tories, then continued through the 1974 Labour government. As part of this policy, many small hospitals were closed. The Bethnal Green Hospital in East London served the local population as a community hospital valued for its continuity of care and accessibility to local residents. It was still working to capacity and once its facilities became withdrawn, patients would have nowhere to go except to extend already over-long waiting lists in other hospitals. In 1977, following orders for closure, its staff decided to ‘occupy’ the hospital while a campaign was mounted to safeguard its future. The only people to move out of the hospital were therefore the administrators. Doctors, nurses and other staff continued to perform their duties, GP’s continued to refer patients, people continued to attend the casualty department and ambulance drivers continued to respond to emergency calls. While patients remained at the hospital, the health authority had a duty to pay staff salaries – and so the occupation took effect.

3. Situation in E London

Panel from the exhibition produced for the hospital foyer

We had recently taken up a Greater London Arts fellowship with a remit to set up and run film and video workshops in that area. Dan Jones, a local social worker, artist and member of the Bethnal Green Hospital campaign committee, approached us with the offer of the hospital as a ‘workshop location’, hoping for a video production that could be used by the campaign. This provided an opportunity to use our practice as a means of supporting issues of relevance to local people.

Panel from the exhibition produced for the hospital foyer

Panel from the exhibition produced for the hospital foyer

Initially we attempted to produce a campaign video through the workshops. It soon became apparent however that process and product diverged in both intention and outcome. In a workshop context non-specialists needed to learn at their own pace. However, a campaign video needs to be rapidly produced and, to be effective, it also has to work aesthetically. We soon found ourselves editing out camera shake and other results of inexpert involvement, feeling torn between providing positive learning experiences for participants, and the result that was needed. Eventually a reasonable outcome was produced in the form of the documentary Emergency. At the same time we resolved to find a better working process.

Panel from the exhibition produced for the hospital foyer

Panel from the exhibition produced for the hospital foyer

Campaigning posters were then requested, though this time we found a more satisfactory way of working directly with members of the campaign committee, producing the work ourselves but with referral to campaign members regarding the meanings to be conveyed.

Poster in use at a demonstration

Poster in use at a demonstration

During the months of making the video and posters we became increasingly involved in the campaign itself, and had taken to photographically documenting events. It gradually became apparent that there was a need for a more in-depth explanation of the issues for people entering the hospital. Drawing on our accumulated photographic documentation and working closely with campaign committee members, an exhibition was devised. Its function was to place the specific campaign within its wider social and political context, and to communicate this complex information in an accessible way though visually powerful way. Referring to the work of artists such as John Heartfield and the Russian Constructivists , particularly Alexander Rodchenko, who we felt had in other times and places produced work with similar intention, we started to develop our use of photomontage into an artistic and political tool.

Panel from the exhibition produced for the hospital foyer

Panel from the exhibition produced for the hospital foyer

While the exhibition fulfilled its purpose in the hospital, another function emerged. Art critic Richard Cork had at the time been asked to curate an exhibition for the Serpentine Gallery in London. Entitled Art for Whom? it was to reflect a growing interest in the potential ‘audience’ for art beyond the gallery going public. Other artists exhibiting included Conrad Atkinson, Islington Schools Environmental Project, Public Art Workshop and Stephen Willats, jointly demonstrating that art was indeed a medium that could deal effectively with issues affecting the lives of ordinary people.

Invitation for the Art for Whom exhibition at the Serpentine Gallery

Invitation for the Art for Whom exhibition at the Serpentine Gallery