Active Energy: Three Mills – open workshop for National Mills Weekend

11am-4pm Saturday 14th May 2016
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To celebrate National Mills Weekend The Geezers will be working with artist Loraine Leeson and engineer Toby Borland in front of House Mill at the Three Mills heritage site to construct a stream wheel for later installation in the Lower Lea. The wheel will be activated by the outflow of water from the mill and will power an aerator to help oxygenate the water and counteract the effects of pollution on the river’s fish and wildlife.

This current phase of the project is taking place as part of the Hydrocitizenship initiative.

New Active Energy turbine planned for the Lower Lea

The next phase of the Active Energy project is to take place in the Lower Lea, where the outflow from part of the Three Mills heritage site will be utilized to drive a small turbine. This will in turn power an aerator that will help oxygenate the water to counteract the effects of pollution and support survival of fish. This is a continuing collaboration with The Geezers and engineer Toby Borland. Other partners include Thames21House Mill and Middlesex University via the Hydrocitizenship research project.
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Launch of Lambeth Floating Marsh

On the evening of 15th September 2015 projections of river organisms were projected along the Thames embankment in Lambeth  to draw attention to the importance of supporting biodiversity along urban rivers.

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This arts/science collaboration between artist Loraine Leeson and scientist Nithin Rai includes new reed bed habitat for micro organisms and invertebrates in long basket structures attached to the hull of the Dutch barge Tamesis Dock. Find out more at www.lambethfloatingmarsh.org.uk.

_MG_3680The projections will run every evening after dark until 24th September 2015.

The project launch was opened by Professor Geoff Petts, Vice Chancellor of University of Westminster. Loraine Leeson and Nithin Rai described the project, while Chris Coode, Deputy Chief Executive of the environmental organization Thames2, provided an overview of the challenges and opportunities for wildlife along the urban reaches of the Thames. Science and Technology dean Professor Jane Lewis drew on her specialist knowledge of micro organism behaviour to consider the benefits of new habitat, and concluded the event by reflecting on the value of the arts and sciences working together to bring these issues to public attention.

Visual effects by Sean Lewis

Lambeth Floating Marsh

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This art/science collaboration between artist Loraine Leeson and biophysical chemist Nithin Rai aims to support biodiversity on the River Thames. Reed beds are being constructed along the hull of the Tamesis Dock barge, situated opposite Tate Britain between Lambeth and Vauxhall bridges, the site of the original Lambeth Marshes. The initiative promotes the ‘greening’ of the shored up banks of the river, while providing a sheltered habitat and monitoring station for river organisms. It will also serve as a pilot for how biodiversity conservation may be expanded along the inner city reaches of urban rivers. Visitors will be able to connect to the project web site via their phones to observe recent activity and learn about the issues affecting biodiversity conservation in the Thames. Watch out in September for images of these organisms projected along the embankment.  The work has been funded by the Western Riverside Environmental Fund, which re-directs revenue from landfill tax for environmental purposes.